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Home » Gemstones » Opal » Composite Opal

Opal Doublet or Opal Triplet
Pictures of Opal Doublet or Opal Triplet


Method of Stone Construction



Most cut opals are solid stones. The entire stone is cut from a single piece of rough (see top illustration). However, some opal rough has very thin but brilliant fire layers. Some artisans cut the stone down to the thin fire layer and glue it to a base of obsidian, potch or basalt - then cut a finished stone. These two part stones are called "opal doublets" (see center illustration). To protect the soft opal from abrasion and impact a crystal clear top of quartz, spinel or other transparent material is sometimes glued onto the opal. This produces a three part stone, called an "opal triplet" (see in the bottom illustration the clear cap, opal layer and base). The photo below shows two opal triplets, one face up and one upside down.


Opal photos Opal Photos
Precious opal Precious Opal
Fire opal Fire Opal
Common opal Common Opal
Black opal Black Opal
Boulder opal Boulder Opal
Opal triplet Assembled Stones



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assembled opals




opal triplet

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