McAfee SECURE sites help keep you safe from identity theft, credit card fraud, spyware, spam, viruses and online scams

Home » Minerals » Cuprite

Cuprite


Mineral Properties and Uses



What is Cuprite?



Cuprite is a supergene copper oxide mineral found in the oxidized zone of copper deposits. It is a minor ore of copper.


Physical Properties of Cuprite

Chemical Classification oxide
Color various shades of red, sometimes nearly black
Streak brownish red
Luster submetallic to adamantine
Diaphaneity subtranslucent
Cleavage none
Mohs Hardness 3.5 to 4
Specific Gravity 5.8 to 6.1
Diagnostic Properties color, streak, luster
Chemical Composition copper oxide, Cu2O
Crystal System isometric
Uses ore of copper



Find it on Geology.com




More from Geology.com


volcanic explosivity index
Volcanic Explosivity: Learn about some of the most explosive volcanic eruptions.
Sunstone: Copper inclusions give this feldspar an aventurescent flash.
Vredefort Impact Crater
The Vredefort Crater is the largest and 2nd oldest impact crater visible on Earth.
Utica Shale
Utica Shale is confirmed as a major source of oil, natural gas and natural gas liquids.
Petrified Wood
Petrified Wood is a fossil that forms when dissolved material precipitates and replaces wood.
US Diamond Mines
US Diamond Mines: Did you know that diamonds can be found in the United States?
Methane Hydrate
Methane Hydrate deposits contain more fuel value than all other fossil fuels combined.
lapis lazuli
Lapis Lazuli - a metamorphic rock and the most popular blue opaque gemstone in history.


Cuprite
Cuprite with chrysocolla from Butte, Montana. This specimen is approximately 3 inches (7.6 centimeters) across.




Chalcotrichite
Chalcotrichite, a variety of cuprite from Bisbee, Arizona. This specimen is approximately 3 inches (7.6 centimeters) across.


More Minerals
  Minerals
  Fluorescent Minerals
  Mineral Identification Chart
  Quartz
  Diamond
  Topaz
  Mohs Hardness Scale
  Find Minerals and Gems




© 2005-2015 Geology.com. All Rights Reserved.
Images, code and content of this website are property of Geology.com. Use without permission is prohibited. Pages on this site are protected by Copyscape.