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Magnesite


Mineral Properties and Uses



Physical Properties of Magnesite

Chemical Classification carbonate
Color white, grayish, yellowish, brownish, colorless
Streak white
Luster vitreous
Diaphaneity transparent to translucent
Cleavage perfect
Mohs Hardness 3.5 to 5.0
Specific Gravity 3.0 to 3.2
Diagnostic Properties dissolves with warm HCl in the powdered form
Chemical Composition MgCO3
Crystal System hexagonal
Uses refractory bricks, cement


Magnesite from Washington
Magnesite from Chewelah, Washington. Specimen is approximately 2-1/2 inches (6.4 centimeters) across.



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Magnesite
Magnesite from Chewelah, Washington. Specimen is approximately 3-1/2 inches (8.9 centimeters) across.




Magnesite from California
Magnesite from Riverside County, California. Specimen is approximately 4 inches (10 centimeters) across.


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