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Home » Minerals » Siderite

Siderite


Mineral Properties and Uses



Physical Properties of Siderite

Chemical Classification carbonate
Color yellowish, reddish, grayish, brown
Streak white
Luster vitreous
Diaphaneity transparent to translucent
Cleavage perfect
Mohs Hardness 3.5 to 4.5
Specific Gravity 3.8 to 4
Diagnostic Properties color, specific gravity, dissolves in HCl
Chemical Composition FeCO3
Crystal System hexagonal
Uses iron ore, pigments


Siderite
Siderite from Roxbury, Connecticut. Specimen is approximately 4 inches (10 centimeters) across.



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Siderite
Siderite from Roxbury, Connecticut. Specimen is approximately 3 inches (7.6 centimeters) across.




Siderite
Siderite from Roxbury, Connecticut. Specimen is approximately 4 inches (10 centimeters) across.


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