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Huge Ancient Landslides in Colorado
April 2, 2013 | Colorado Geological Survey on Facebook

The Colorado Geological Suvey shares aerial images of two ancient landslides that consist of about 635,000,000 cubic feet of mobilized debris and cover an area of about 2.3 square miles.


  Related Stories

The Saidmarreh Landslide
March 29, 2014 | Geology.com
The Saidmarreh Landslide in western Iran is one of the largest landslides in the world. It occurred about 10,000 years ago when about 5 cubic miles of limestone detached along bedding planes and slipped down the north flank of the Kabir Kuh anticline. The slide debris had a run-out distance of over 9 miles. It can be clearly seen on satellite images today. NASA Landsat Geocover image annotated by Geology.com

Landslide Mapping Needed in North Carolina
November 26, 2013 | WSPA.com
Hundreds of landslides occur every year in North Carolina but lawmakers have almost eliminated a program that can help developers avoid building homes, commercial and public buildings on ancient landslides and slide-prone areas. It can also help the state highway department and utility companies avoid building roads and pipelines across ancient landslides and slide-prone areas. This one-time job was costing about $350,000 per year and would only require mapping the western part of the state where most landslides occur. In a 24-year period landslides in the state killed 7 people and destroyed 85 homes. Not available

More Large Ancient Slides in the USA
April 15, 2014 | The Bellingham Herald
An article in The Bellingham Herald gives details on several very large landslides that dwarf the Oso Slide and all involved sudden, unpredictable collapse. Related: Landslide incidence map


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