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Stranded Natural Gas
April 26, 2013 | United States Geological Survey

Stranded gas is natural gas in discovered conventional gas and oil fields that is currently not commercially producible for either physical or economic reasons. USGS has published a new report titled: Role of Stranded Gas in Increasing Global Gas Supplies.


  Related Stories

Shell Bets Big on Natural Gas
May 6, 2013 | New York Times
Royal Dutch Shell has made major investments in developing conventional and unconventional natural gas resources in several parts of the world, building LNG terminals to prepare it for distant markets, develop the first floating LNG facility and develop new methods to convert natural gas into liquid fuels.

Energy Consumption Growth in China
February 13, 2014 | Energy Information Administration
"China’s robust economic growth and thirst for energy resources in the past decade has driven it to become the top global energy consumer. China has the largest oil and gas production in the Asia-Pacific region and the largest coal production in the world, but the country’s escalating energy demand is increasing its reliance on imports and need to secure more energy supplies." Quoted from the Energy Information Administration's country analysis brief.

How Much of Our Natural Gas is from Shale?
February 11, 2014 | Energy Information Administration
The Energy Information Administration recently published their annual Liquid Fuels and Natural Gas in the Americas report. It includes an interesting chart showing that in 2012, shale formations accounted for about 40% of the United States' natural gas production.


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