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Understanding Galapagos Volcanoes
November 25, 2013 | USGS

“The chance transit of a satellite over the April 2009 eruption of Fernandina volcano — the most active in South America’s famed Galápagos archipelago — has revealed for the first time the mechanism behind the characteristic pattern of eruptive fissures on the island chain’s volcanoes.” Quoted from the USGS Newsroom.


  Related Stories

Understanding Galapagos Volcanoes
October 31, 2013 | USGS
"The chance transit of a satellite over the April 2009 eruption of Fernandina volcano — the most active in South America's famed Galápagos archipelago — has revealed for the first time the mechanism behind the characteristic pattern of eruptive fissures on the island chain's volcanoes."

Seafloor Volcanoes Modified Antarctic Climate?
September 2, 2013 | LA Times
A line of ancient volcanoes that grew on the floor of the Southern Ocean tens of millions of years ago may have blocked ocean currents and modified Antarctic climate.

A Rumbling Volcano Beneath Antarctic Ice?
November 18, 2013 | Washington University
“My first thought was, ‘OK, maybe it’s just coincidence.’ But then I looked more closely and realized that the mountains were actually volcanoes and there was an age progression to the range. The volcanoes closest to the seismic events were the youngest ones.” Quoted from the Washington University press release.


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