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Who Uses Landsat Images and Why
December 4, 2013 | USGS

“To learn more about who uses Landsat imagery and the value these users see in Landsat imagery, the U.S. Geological Survey analyzed responses to a survey of more than 40,000 individuals who accessed free Landsat images from the archive at the USGS Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center. Quoted from the USGS press release.


  Related Stories

First Images from the New Landsat Mission
March 24, 2013 | NASA
"On March 18, 2013, the newly launched Landsat Data Continuity Mission began to send back images of Earth from both of its instruments — the Operational Land Imager and the Thermal Infrared Sensor. This view of Fort Collins, Colorado, is among the satellite’s first images." Quoted from the NASA image release.

A New Generation of Landsat
February 11, 2013 | USGS
"Landsat images from space are not just pictures. They contain many layers of data collected at different points along the visible and invisible light spectrum. Consequently, Landsat images can show where vegetation is thriving and where it is stressed, where droughts are occurring, where wildland fire is a danger, and where erosion has altered coastlines or river courses." Quoted from the USGS press release.

The Saidmarreh Landslide
March 29, 2014 | Geology.com
The Saidmarreh Landslide in western Iran is one of the largest landslides in the world. It occurred about 10,000 years ago when about 5 cubic miles of limestone detached along bedding planes and slipped down the north flank of the Kabir Kuh anticline. The slide debris had a run-out distance of over 9 miles. It can be clearly seen on satellite images today. NASA Landsat Geocover image annotated by Geology.com


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