Home » Landslides » Saidmarreh Landslide

The Saidmarreh Landslide


This ancient landslide in Iran moved about five cubic miles of material.


Saidmarreh Landslide

Saidmarreh Landslide: Landsat image of Saidmarreh Landslide in Saidmarreh, Iran. The source area of the slide is bounded on the southwest by the crest of the Kabir Kuh anticline. Debris from the slide travelled down the flank of the anticline, across the Karkheh River and continued across the valley floor. Some material in the slide was carried a distance of 14 kilometers (9 miles). Enlarge image.

Google satellite image of the Saidmarreh Landslide area.

The Saidmarreh Slide

Largest landslide location map
Saidmarreh landslide is located in western Iran.

One of the largest landslides that can be easily recognized on satellite images is the Saidmarreh Landslide in western Iran. The slide occurred about 10,000 years ago, when about 20 cubic kilometers (about 5 cubic miles) of Lower Miocene and Eocene limestone detached along bedding planes and slipped down the north flank of the Kabir Kuh anticline. The maximum vertical descent was about 1600 meters (5250 feet).

Related:   The World's Largest Landslides

Google satellite image of the Saidmarreh Landslide area.




Saidmarreh Landslide Information
[1] Shoaei, Z. and Ghayoumian, J., 1998, Seimareh landslide, the largest complex slide in the world, In: Moore D. and Hungr O. (editors), Eighth International Congress of the International Association for Engineering Geology and the Environment, Proceedings, Pages 1337-1342.

[2] Harrison, J.V. and Falcon, N.L., 1938, An Ancient Landslip at Saidmarreh in Southwestern Iran, The Journal of Geology, Volume 46, pages 296-309.

[3] Dave Petley, 2009, The biggest landslide of them all - Saidmareh, Iran, The Landslide Blog. Last accessed June 2017.


The sliding slab was about 15 kilometers (9 miles) wide and had a surface area of about 165 kilometers (64 square miles). Debris from the slide crossed the Karkheh River at the base of the slope and spread across the valley floor. Some material in the slide had a travel distance of over 14 kilometers (9 miles).

The slide debris dammed the Karkheh River, causing a large lake to form behind the dam. The lake persisted long enough for up to 150 meters of sediment to accumulate on its bottom (these sediments currently support several thousand acres of cultivated land). The lake then breached the dam and eroded a channel through it. The current landscape is shown in the Landsat image at the top of this page and in the Google satellite image.

Contributor:



More Landslides
  Debris Flows
  Landslides
  Geology Tools
  Yosemite Rockfall Photos
  Largest Landslides
  Yosemite Rockfall Hazards
  Lahars
  Largest Tsunami

geology store

More From Geology.com:


Download Google Earth Free
Free Google Earth software allows you to browse seamless world satellite images. Free.
gem photos
100+ Gems - Photos of over 100 beautiful gems ranging from the popular to the obscure.
Quartzite
Quartzite: a nonfoliated metamorphic rock composed almost entirely of quartz.
rocks
Rock Gallery: Photos of igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks.
Topaz
Topaz is a popular birthstone and the #8 mineral in the Mohs Hardness Scale.
Don't Go To Jail
Know the Rules before removing rocks or minerals from public or private property.
Facts About Copper
Facts About Copper: Information about copper uses, production, resources and more.
Ant Hill Garnets
Ant Hill Garnets - tiny garnets that ants haul to the surface and discard on their anthill.