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Ancient City's Destruction by Exploding Space Rock May Have Inspired Biblical Story of Sodom
Smithsonian
Phytoplankton Blooms from Space
Geology.com

Swirls of color, caused by phytoplankton blooms, make an interesting and beautiful scene off the eastern shore of South Island, New Zealand. The Banks Peninsula can be seen in the southwestern corner of the image and the city of Christchurch borders the coastline immediately north of the peninsula. Lake Ellesmere, pea-green with algal growth, is a lagoon behind a spit on the southeastward facing shore. NASA acquired this satellite image on May 29, 2021.

Treasure Hunter Finds a Hoard of Gold Buried by an Iron Age Chieftain
Live Science
An amateur treasure hunter in Denmark found these spectacular gold artifacts, which contain an estimated one kilogram of gold.
The Many Uses of Gold
Geology.com

Jewelry manufacturing is the most important consumptive use of gold in the United States. Image copyright iStockphoto / Angelo Marcantonio.

Modeling Volcanic Debris Clouds
EOS Earth & Space Science News
What is Volcanic Ash?
Geology.com

Volcanic ash consists of powder-size to sand-size particles of igneous rock material that have been blown into the air by an erupting volcano. Ashfall deposits are generally thick and coarse in particle size near the volcano. However, at distance the deposit gets thinner and finer.

The United States Exported Slightly More Petroleum Than It Imported in the First Half of 2021
Energy Information Administration

Graph by the Energy Information Administration.

Alrosa Is Looking At How Kimberlite Can Grab CO2 from the Atmosphere
JCK Online
Thousands Evacuate Following a Volcanic Eruption on the Island of La Palma, Canary Islands
ABC News

Where Are the Canary Islands?
Geology.com

The Canary Islands are an archipelago of seven large and several smaller islands located in the Atlantic Ocean about 60 miles (about 100 kilometers) off the northwest coast of Africa. The islands are an autonomous community of Spain, and the closest countries on the African continent are Morocco and Western Sahara.

M 6.5 Earthquake Off the Coast of Nicaragua
United States Geological Survey

Map by the United States Geological Survey.

Canary Islands Volcano Engulfs Village Minutes After Residents Flee Their Homes
BBC News

M5.9 Earthquake Near Melbourne, Australia Forces Hospitals and Residents to Evacuate
The New York Times
La Palma Volcano Spews Lava Hundreds of Feet in the Air, But Don't Expect a 'Mega-Tsunami'
Live Science
Thousands Flee Canaries Volcano as Lava Streams Destroy Homes
Reuters
De Beers Has a New Diamond Recovery Ship
ShipInSight.com
De Beers took possession of the ship at Damen Shipyards, Mangalia, Romania, and is on its four-week voyage to Cape Town, South Africa, where the diamond recovery plant will be installed.
Taking Yellowstone Seismology to the Classroom for Some "Deep Learning"
United States Geological Survey

Seismogram from station YTP in Yellowstone National Park showing earthquakes from the swarm beneath Yellowstone Lake that began late on July 15, 2021. Each row represents 30 minutes of seismic data. Vertical red lines indicate that the amplitude of the signal was truncated, or "clipped," to avoid obscuring the signal from events above it (earlier in time) or below it (later in time). Seismogram by USGS.

NASA Models Methane Sources, Movement Around Globe
NASA

These 200,000-Year-Old Hand and Footprints Could Be the World's Earliest Cave Art
Smithsonian.com
"Land of the Burning Ground": The History and Traditions of Indigenous People in Yellowstone
United States Geological Survey

Dragon's Mouth in the Mud Volcano Area of Yellowstone National Park. Photo by Cole Messa, University of Wyoming.

Ecuador Energy Report
Energy Information Administration

In 2020, Ecuador was the fifth-largest oil producer in South America behind Brazil, Colombia, Argentina, and Venezuela.

Diamond Foundry Plans a 10 Million Carat Growing Facility to Produce Gem and Industrial Diamonds
JCK Online
Quote from the article: "While the plant will focus on producing industrial diamonds that can be used for semiconductors, it will also create traditional lab-grown diamonds suitable for jewelry."
Fossil Fjords in Namibia
NASA Earth Observatory

Ice that carved a network of valleys 300 million years ago has long since disappeared, but the original shapes of the valleys remain. NASA Earth Observatory image by Joshua Stevens, using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission and information from Dietrich, P. et al. (2021). Story by Kathryn Hansen.

Capturing Yellowstone's Elusive Gases
United States Geological Survey

Gas bubbles through a sample bottle containing alkaline solution, allowing for separation of different gas phases. Photo by Deb Bergfeld, USGS.

Scientists Can Now "Sniff" Yellowstone Gases in Real Time
United States Geological Survey

Laura Clor, USGS scientist, performing maintenance on the SNIF multi-GAS station on Mount St. Helens, Washington. Photo by Peter Kelly, USGS.

UN Chief Urges 'Rapid' Emission Cuts to Curb Climate Change
Associated Press
Prehistoric People Built Little Artificial Islands in Scottish Lochs
Atlas Obscura
Hurricane Ida Disrupted Crude Oil Production and Refining Activity
Energy Information Administration

Graph by the Energy Information Administration.

Unusual Snowfall in Greenland
NASA Earth Observatory

The remnants of Hurricane Larry dropped abundant snowfall on Greenland just as the summer melt season was coming to an end.

Missouri Cave Filled With Ancient Artwork Sold Against Osage Nation's Wishes
Smithsonian
Quote from the article: "At one point, archaeologists thought the art might be modern graffiti due to its high level of detail."
Pictograph Photo Gallery
Geology.com

A "pictograph" is a drawing or painting that is created on a rock. It is not "carved" into the rock - that would be a "petroglyph." Shown in the photo above is part of the ancient artwork of "Cave of the Hands," a series of caves in Argentine where ancient people painted on the walls starting over 9000 years ago.

The Greatest Killer in New Orleans Wasn't the Hurricane. It Was the Heat.
The New York Times
Subtitle for the article: "A huge power failure after Hurricane Ida left vulnerable residents in sweltering apartments for days. At least 10 deaths in the city have been tied to the heat."
Scientists Confirm Thousands of Ancient Super Eruptions on Mars
NASA on YouTube

August 2021 Was Earth's Sixth-Warmest August on Record
NOAA

A collage of typical climate and weather-related events: floods, heatwaves, drought, hurricanes, wildfires and loss of glacial ice. Image by NOAA.

Stonehenge Is Undergoing Repairs for the First Time in Decades
Smithsonian
Diabase: One of the Rock Types Used to Build Stonehenge
Geology.com

Stonehenge is one of the most famous stone structures ever made by humans. Stones of the monument's inner circle are made of diabase. They were transported about 240 miles from Wales to the monument site in England in about 2100 BC. Image copyright iStockphoto / bonetiz.

White Gold! The Electric Vehicle Boom Sparks a Rush for Lithium in Argentina
Reuters
Scientists Want to Resurrect the Wooly Mammoth. They Just Got $15M to Make It Happen
CNN
Nicholas Strengthens and Hits the Texas Coast as a Hurricane and Major Rain/Flood Threat
The Weather Channel
Landslides from Mexico's September 7th M7.1 Guerrero Earthquake
The Landslide Blog
From 4% to 45%: The Ambitious Blueprint for Solar Power
The New York Times
Tropical Storm Nicholas Could Dump Up to 20 Inches of Rain on the Gulf Coast
NBC News
NPR: The Federal Government Sells Flood-Prone Homes To Often Unsuspecting Buyers
National Public Radio
Scientists Complete the First Map of the World's Coral Reefs
Smithsonian.com
GIA Says Fake Inscriptions, Reports Accompanied Lab-Grown, Treated Diamonds
JCK Online
Greenland Expects Up to Four Feet of Snow and 100 MPH Winds from the Remnants of Hurricane Larry
National Public Radio
Who would have thought that Greenland would ever get four feet of snow from a hurricane.
Azerbaijan Energy Report
Energy Information Administration

Crude oil exports out of Azerbaijan were about 568,000 b/d in 2020. Most of the exports were destined for countries in Europe, with Italy receiving 34% of Azerbaijan's crude oil exports in 2020. Graph from the United States Energy Information Administration based upon data from the BP Statistical Review of World Energy 2021.

A Meeting of Ice and Dunes
NASA Earth Observatory

Shadows accentuate the topography of sand dunes in the landscape around Khar Nuur Lake in Mongolia.

USGS Hazards Science -- Be Informed and Be Prepared
United States Geological Survey

Flooded house in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy in Mantoloking, New Jersey. Photo by USGS.

Tracking Tropical Storm Nicholas Heads for the Texas Gulf Coast
National Hurricane Center

Map by the National Hurricane Center. Monday 4:00 AM CDT.

Lab-Grown Diamond Prices Are Dropping Dramatically
JCK Online
What Are Lab-Grown Diamonds?
Geology.com

Spectacular Color in Lab-Created Diamonds: Although lab-created diamonds have been produced since the 1950s, the early products fell far short of having the color and clarity needed for use in fine jewelry. The lab-created diamonds in the photo above represent the current "state of the art" in diamond creation and manufacturing. They have exceptional clarity, they have been cut to perfection, and their vibrant colors span the visible spectrum. Photography by Swarovski Group.

Effects of Blue Fluorescence on Diamond Appearance
Gemological Institute of America
NASA's Perseverance Mars Rover Collects First Core Samples & Early Science (Media Briefing)
NASA

Another Mudslide on Interstate 70 Through Glenwood Canyon
NBC News

Photo by the Colorado Transportation Department.

Gold Fever Is a Thing: Meet Scotland's New Prospectors
The Guardian
The Many Uses of Gold
Geology.com

This pie chart shows how gold was used in the United States in 2019, not including gold bullion. The main uses were in jewelry (50%) and electronics (37%). The minting of official coins accounted for 8% of the gold used, and 5% was for other uses. Data from the USGS Mineral Commodity Summaries for 2019.

Over 230 Medical Journals: Climate Crisis Is the "Greatest" Health Threat
Axios
Over 1,000 Lightning Strikes Occurred Overnight in California, Igniting New Wildfires
CNN
World Lightning Strikes Map
Geology.com

The map above shows the average yearly counts of lightning flashes per square kilometer based on data collected by NASA's Lightning Imaging Sensor on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite. Places where less than one flash occurred (on average) each year are gray or light purple. The places with the largest number of lightning strikes are deep red, grading to black.

The World's Biggest Plant to Capture CO2 from the Air Just Opened in Iceland
The Washington Post
Plant managers hope that they are able to remove 4,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide per year from the atmosphere and pump it into underground caverns where it is transformed into a dark gray stone. There are also some potential commercial uses for the captured carbon dioxide.
Mapping Kilauea's Gas Emissions
United States Geological Survey

HVO scientists walk transects along the down-dropped portion of Kilauea caldera floor as part of a gas survey conducted on July 22. The multigas instruments carried on the scientists' backs measure the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), water vapor (H2O), and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) via an inlet hose oriented toward the ground surface. These measurements will provide a map showing areas of the caldera floor where specific volcanic gases are being emitted and their concentrations. The light-colored ground the scientists are walking on is evidence of such gases interacting with, and altering, the darker volcanic rocks in the area. Photo by K. Mulliken, USGS.

USGS Job Openings
USAJobs.gov
Smithsonian Artifacts that Tell the Story of 9/11
Smithsonian
Traces of Lead Found in 5,000-Year-Old Human Remains
Smithsonian.com
Galena: The Primary Ore of Lead
Geology.com

Galena is one of the easiest ores to smelt. It can simply be placed in a fire and then lead can be recovered from under the ashes when the fire goes out. Archaeologists have found evidence that lead was smelted as early as 6500 BC in what is now Turkey.

Small amounts of silver were refined from lead by the Romans about 2000 years ago. Public domain image by Georgius Agricola.

The U.S. Just Had Its Hottest Summer on Record
NBC News
What Are Earthquake Lights?
United States Geological Survey
Mexico's Blue "Earthquake Lights" Might Not Have Been Directly Related to the Earthquake
National Public Radio
Austin Elliott, a USGS earthquake scientist, believes that much of the light show in Mexico was produced by power flashes in the electricity grid.
Friction Between Rocks Causes Triboluminescence
Geology.com

Saturn's Seismic Activity Makes Waves in Its Iconic Rings
Smithsonian.com

New, Giant Carnivorous Dinosaur Was a Terror to Smaller Tyrannosaurs
Smithsonian
Picturing Earth: Astronaut Photography In Focus
NASA on YouTube

Water Level and Water Chemistry Measurements for a Well in Kilauea's South Caldera Region
United States Geological Survey

The water level in Keller Well was measured at approximately 1686.75 feet below the ground surface. Though an intrusion of magma took place beneath the ground surface in Kilauea's south caldera region from August 23 to 30, the water level did not show significant changes as a result of this event. USGS photo by P. Nadeau.

Powerful Earthquake Strikes Southwest Mexico
CNN
A powerful earthquake struck the southwest of Mexico late Tuesday, causing widespread shaking as far away as Mexico City and killing at least one person.
M7.0 Earthquake Near Acapulco, Mexico
United States Geological Survey

Map by the United States Geological Survey.

Zuiderzee Works
NASA Earth Observatory

Where the Netherlands meets the North Sea, there is an impressive confluence of natural and man-made features - designed to keep rising seas out of the low-lying country.

Ice Persists in the Northwest Passage
NASA Earth Observatory

The decline of sea ice in the Arctic has made the Northwest Passage increasingly viable for ships, but it's still not always smooth sailing. This was NASA's Image of the Day for September 8, 2021.

What is the Northwest Passage?
Geology.com

Northwest Passage Map: The red lines are possible routes that ships can use to traverse the Northwest Passage, a shipping route that connects the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean through the Canadian Arctic.

A Robust Proxy for Geomagnetic Reversal Rates in Deep Time
EOS Earth & Space Science News