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Growth in Global LNG Export Capacity Will Be Limited in 2023
Energy Information Administration

In 2023, just four new liquefied natural gas export projects are expected to come online worldwide, with a combined capacity of 1.0 billion cubic feet per day. The total annual LNG capacity additions will be the lowest since 2013, when 0.7 Bcf/d of new export capacity was placed in service. Graph by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

What is LNG - Liquefied Natural Gas?
Geology.com
LNG carrier ship
An LNG carrier ship docked at the Bontang LNG liquefaction terminal in East Kalimantan, Indonesia. The LNG is carried in the ship's four dome-shaped tanks. Image copyright iStockphoto / Mayumi Terao.

U.S. Non-Fuel Mineral Production Increases $3.6 Billion in 2022
United States Geological Survey

Map from the Mineral Commodity Summaries 2023 shows the value of nonfuel minerals produced by each state in 2022. The Mineral Commodity Summaries are issued annually by the USGS National Minerals Information Center and are the earliest comprehensive source of the previous year's worldwide mineral industry data. USGS image.

Dusty Copper River Delta
NASA Earth Observatory

Dust plumes from this part of Alaska happen in autumn when winds are strong, water levels are low, and snow has not yet blanketed the floodplain. Much of the dust is believed to be glacial flour (rock particles ground into fine silt and smaller particles by the actions of glaciers). NASA Earth Observatory image by Joshua Stevens, story by Kathryn Hansen.

AGI Webinar: The Geoscience Workforce - Today and Future Trajectories
American Geosciences Institute
U.S. Seeks to Tighten Rules on Russian Diamonds
JCK Online
Villarrica Volcano Is Sputtering in Chile
NASA Earth Observatory

An astronaut on the International Space Station captured this photograph of minor explosions from one of the most active volcanoes in Chile.

Cheneso Floods Madagascar
NASA Earth Observatory

Cheneso is a slow-moving tropical storm that dumped an enormous volume of rain on Madagascar. The storm triggered flash floods and landslides along the island's northwestern coast. In the image you can see the brownish yellow sediment filling the rivers and causing thick sediment plumes where they enter the Mozambique Channel. NASA Earth Observatory images by Joshua Stevens, using Landsat data from the U.S. Geological Survey and MODIS data from NASA EOSDIS LANCE and GIBS/Worldview. Story by Kathryn Hansen.

Rio Tinto's Lost Radioactive Capsule Found on Roadside in Western Australia
CNBC
As the Colorado River Dries Up, States Can't Agree on Saving Water
Gift Article from The Washington Post
What 70 Years of Data Says About Where Predators Kill Humans
Smithsonian
U.S. Natural Gas Consumption Reaches a Daily Record High in December 2022
Energy Information Administration

Graph by the Energy Information Administration.

East Africa's Oldest Modern Human Fossil Is Way Older Than Previously Thought
Smithsonian
East Africa's Great Rift Valley: A Complex Rift System
Geology.com

Colored Digital Elevation Model showing tectonic plate boundaries, outlines of the elevation highs demonstrating the thermal bulges and large lakes of East Africa. Enlarge Image. The basemap is a Space Shuttle radar topography image by NASA.

Plate Tectonics Map - Plate Boundary Map
Geology.com

According the theory of plate tectonics, Earth's outer shell is made up of a series of plates. The map above shows names and generalized locations of Earth's major tectonic plates. These plates move and interact with one another to produce earthquakes, volcanoes, mountain ranges, ocean trenches and other geologic processes and features. Map prepared by the United States Geological Survey.

Lake Sediments Record North Carolina's Coal Legacy
EOS Science News
Quote from the article: "Coal ash-polluted lakes are in residential and recreational areas, invoking concern for the health of local residents and ecosystems."
Ocean, Hazards Bills Enacted into Law
Speaking of Geoscience Blog
Quote from the blog post: "In a flurry of activity just before the holidays, several science policy bills, mostly related to oceans and hazards, passed at the end of the 117th Congress and were signed into law."
Malacca Strait: How One Volcano Could Trigger World Chaos
BBC

Map of the Strait of Malacca choke point by the United States Department of Defense.

Flood Level Observation, Operations, and Decision Support Act
U.S. Congress
"To establish a national integrated flood information system within the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and for other purposes."
Rio Tinto Apologises for Losing Radioactive Capsule in Australia
BBC News
Professional Meteorite Hunter Says He Found Pieces of Meteor in Oklahoma
KOCO.com
What Are Meteors? What Are Meteorites? There Is a Difference
Geology.com

A fine example of a Sikhote-Alin iron meteorite, weighing 409.9 grams, which was seen to fall in eastern Russia in February of 1947. This meteorite is described as an individual, as it is a complete mass (rather than an exploded shrapnel fragment) which fell to earth on its own. Note the abundant overlapping regmaglypts (thumbprints) caused by surface melting as the meteorite flew through our atmosphere. Regmaglypts are one of the key surface features used to identify meteorites. Photo copyright Aerolite Meteorites / Geoffrey Notkin.

Norway Finds "Substantial" Mineral Resources on Its Seabed
Reuters
The resources include copper and rare earth metals on the extended continental shelf off western Norway.
What's Up at the Bottom of the Ocean?
EOS Science News
Iceberg Twice the Size of New York City Breaks off From Antarctica
Smithsonian
California Storms Create 10 "Ephemeral" Waterfalls in Yosemite National Park
SFGATE
Which State Has the Three Tallest Waterfalls in the United States?
Geology.com

Believed to be the second tallest waterfall in the United States, this fall is not an uninterrupted vertical drop. Instead the water descends a very steep slope and has a significant amount of contact with bedrock. The tallest waterfall in the United States is a similar waterfall, located about 1200 feet to the west. Image copyright by iStockphoto and Brandon Means.

The Science Behind the Oldest Trees on Earth
Smithsonian
Proved Reserves of Natural Gas Increased 32% in the United States During 2021
Energy Information Administration

Graph by the Energy Information Administration.

Norway's Last Arctic Miners Struggle with Coal Mine's End
Associated Press

The coal mine, on the remote island of Svalbard, is closing because its primary customer, the community of Longyearbyen, is switching their electric power generation from coal to diesel. Svalbard is north of the Arctic Circle, the 10 degree C isotherm, and the treeline.

China's Gold Production Climbs More than 13% in 2022
Kitco.com
It's Been 323 Years Since the Last Cascadia Subduction Zone Earthquake.
Are You Ready for the Big One? (Highly Recommended)

Oregon Live
Earth's "Geological Thermostat" Is too Slow to Prevent Climate Change
NewScientist

Image of karst mountains in the Guilin area of China that were produced by unique weathering of limestone, a sedimentary rock composed of calcium carbonate. Photograph by Chensiyuan, displayed here under a Creative Commons License.

River Floods Can Trigger Powerful Underwater Landslides (Turbidity Currents)
EOS Science News
Storegga: The World's Largest-Known Submarine Landslide
Geology.com
Storegga Submarine Landslide
Storegga Submarine Landslide: The Storegga Slide is the largest-known submarine landslide. It occurred in the Norwegian Sea about 8200 years ago. The slide triggered a tsunami that produced significant run-ups on the west coast of Norway, Scotland, the Shetland Islands, and the Faroe Islands.

Mercury Helps to Detail Earth's Most Massive Extinction Event
Phys.org
Italy, Libya Sign $8B Natural Gas Deal as PM Meloni Visits Tripoli
Associated Press
Meloni visited Libya hoping to replace natural gas supplies that were previously obtained from Russia.
Why Desalination Won't Save States Dependent on Colorado River Water
CNBC
As the Colorado River Shrinks, Washington Prepares to Spread the Pain
Gift Article from the New York Times
Quote from the article: "The seven states that rely on the river for water are not expected to reach a deal on cuts... [leaving the Biden administration to impose reductions]."
The Science Behind the Oldest Trees on Earth
Smithsonian
Quote from the article: "How experts have determined that bristlecone pines, sequoias and baobabs have stood for thousands of years"
An Asteroid Just Passed Very Close to Earth
Smithsonian
Quote from the article: "The truck-sized space rock came within 2,200 miles of our planet, closer than some satellites.
Groundwater in Key Agricultural Regions of Nevada Is Being Depleted Faster than It Can Be Replenished
United States Geological Survey

The extent of water-level declines in Smith and Mason Valleys, Nevada, 1970-2020. Large water-level declines are signified by warmer colors. Maps by the United States Geological Survey.

World's Longest Conveyor Belt System
NASA Earth Observatory

Quote from the article: "The conveyor belt helps transport an essential agricultural fertilizer from the remote reaches of Western Sahara to farmlands across the world." Astronaut photo from the International Space Station, prepared for internet publication by Lauren Dauphin, story by Emily Cassidy.

Netherlands To Shut Down Europe's Largest Gas Field - This Year
Oil Price
Since 2021 the amount of gas being removed from the field has been reduced because an increasing number of earthquake are occurring in and around the field. Many believe that removal of the gas causes a removal of support for the overlying rocks. The result is subsidence and fracturing of the overlying rocks. Earthquakes occur when subsurface rocks fracture.
A Remarkable Number of Landslides in California
The Landslide Blog
Record amounts of rain in some parts of California have resulted in a surprising number of landslides.
A Coastal Cliff Collapse at Blacks Beach, San Diego, California
The Landslide Blog

U.S. Crude Oil Production Will Increase to New Records in 2023 and 2024
Energy Information Administration

Graph by the Energy Information Administration.

Can These Rocks Really Power Light Bulbs? No, Say the Experts
BBC News
In the Past 20 Years, Natural Gas Has Displaced Most Coal-Fired Generation in Pennsylvania
Energy Information Administration

Graph by the Energy Information Administration.

Why the Pacific Ocean Turned Pink Off an Area of the California Coast
SFGATE.com
FY2023 Appropriations Bill Increases Funding for Scientific Agencies
Speaking of Geoscience Blog
"The U.S. Geological Survey received US$1.5 billion, an increase of 7%, plus an additional US$41 million from the supplemental bill for expenses related to natural disasters."
Primate-Like Critters Survived in the Arctic When It Was a Lush, Warm Swamp
Smithsonian
The Spin of Earth's Inner Core May Be Changing
Smithsonian
Bridging the Weather-to-Climate Prediction Gap
EOS Science News
U.S. Crude Oil Production Forecast to Rise in 2023 and 2024 to Record High Levels
Energy Information Administration

Graph by the United States Energy Information Administration.

'Self-Healing' Concrete May Have Preserved Ancient Roman Structures
Smithsonian
Researchers Find Rare 17-Pound Meteorite in Antarctic Ice
Smithsonian
Quote from the article: "A team of researchers has discovered five new meteorites in Antarctica - one of which weighs a whopping 16.7 pounds."
Antarctica: The Best Place to Hunt Meteorites
Geology.com
meteorite find
Meteorite Find: When meteorite hunters find a specimen in the field, it is photographed on-site with a measurement scale and an identification number visible in the background. NASA image.

Mysteries Remain About Bahama Whiting Events
NASA Earth Observatory

As early as the 1930s, researchers noticed that odd, milky-white patches of water sporadically discolor the generally bluer and shallow waters of the Bahama Banks. Sampling the discolored water patches made clear that these whiting events were caused by an abundance of fine-grained calcium carbonate particles suspended in the water. However, why surges of calcium carbonate end up suspended in the water at particular times has never been clear. NASA Earth Observatory image by Joshua Stevens, using Landsat data from the U.S. Geological Survey. Story by Adam Voiland.

Where is The Bahamas?
Geology.com

The Bahamas is a sovereign country and an archipelago of over 700 islands, islets, and cays (low-elevation islands composed of sand, coral debris, or limestone - also known as "keys"). It is located in the North Atlantic Ocean, east of Florida, northeast of Cuba, and northwest of the island of Hispaniola. Image by Peter Hermes Furian / Alamy Stock Photo.

Earth's Inner Core Seems to be Slowing Its Spin
Gift Article from The Washington Post
Eerie Flying Spiral Spotted by Mauna Kea Telescope
Hawaii News Now
Sea Level Science and Applications Support Coastal Resilience
EOS Science News
ShakeAlert Goes Galactic
United States Geological Survey
Why even space travelers need earthquake warning.
France Generated 68% of Its Electricity from Nuclear Power in 2022
Energy Information Administration

Graph by the Energy Information Administration.

China to Accelerate the Construction of Coal-Fired Power Plants
Oil Price
An Enormous Martian Cloud Returns Every Spring. Scientists Found Out Why.
Mashable

Mars Express HRSC image of one of the orographic clouds that periodically form near the Arisa Mons volcano on Mars. These linear clouds can reach lengths of up to 1500 kilometers. Image by ESA/DLR/FU Berlin/J. Cowart, displayed here under a Creative Commons License.

How to See the Green Comet Passing Earth for the First Time in 50,000 Years
Gift Article from The Washington Post
Rocks Vacuumed Off The Deep Seafloor Can Power Electric Cars. But Is It Worth It?
(Highly Recommended)

Business Insider on YouTube

What is Manganese? How is it Used?
Geology.com

Seafloor Manganese Ore: Manganese nodule collected in 1982 from the Pacific Ocean. Manganese nodules are often rich in manganese, iron, nickel, copper, and cobalt. The nodule is about four inches across. Photograph by Walter Kolle, displayed here under a Creative Commons License.

A New Report Outlines a Vision for National Wastewater Surveillance
Gift Article from the New York Times
Quote from the article: "The Covid-19 pandemic demonstrated the promise of tracking pathogens in sewage."
The First Small Modular Nuclear Reactor Is Certified for Use in the United States
Associated Press
In Rain-Soaked California, Few Homeowners Have Flood Insurance
Associated Press
Homeowners Insurance Often Does Not Cover the Most Common Geologic Hazards
Geology.com

Your homeowners insurance might not cover damage from floods, earthquakes, expansive soils, hurricanes, landslides, subsidence and other geologic hazards.


Homeowners Insurance Exclusions: A portion of the author's homeowners insurance policy that excludes the most common geologic hazards (underlined in red). Check your homeowners policy to determine if it covers hazards that are likely to occur in your area. Your insurance agent might be able to help you obtain additional coverage for hazards of concern in your area.

Sections of the Drina River Near Visegrad, Bosnia Become a Floating Garbage Dump
Associated Press
Flooding caused trash dumped in unregulated disposal sites on stream banks and flood plains to be picked up and carried down stream. Now tons of waste are caught behind a trash boom in front of a hydroelectric dam.
Europe's Mission to Jupiter's Icy Moons Is Ready for Launch
BBC
Quote from the article: "The six-tonne spacecraft will make a series of flybys of Callisto, Ganymede and Europa... to investigate whether any of these worlds are habitable."
Newberry Volcano Is an Impressive but Unappreciated Giant
United States Geological Survey

Quote from the article: "Newberry Volcano is one of the largest and most hazardous active volcanoes in the United States. It is designated a "very high threat" volcano in a recent assessment by the U.S. Geological Survey." Location map for Newberry Volcano by the United States Geological Survey (source).

Eruptive Activity at Pavlof Volcano Has Stopped
Alaska Volcano Observatory
Summary Report From AVO: Eruptive activity at Pavlof Volcano has stopped. Seismicity has decreased to background levels, and no explosions have been detected since December 11, 2022. Weakly elevated surface temperatures and minor steaming from the recently active vent continue to be observed intermittently in satellite and web camera imagery, consistent with cooling of previously erupted lava. Due to the decrease in activity to background levels, we are lowering the Aviation Color Code to Green and the Volcano Alert Level to Normal.
Pavlof Volcano
Geology.com

An ash plume from Pavlof being carried by the wind, May 18, 2013. Pavlof often erupts with little warning and can send clouds of volcanic ash high enough to be a threat to local and international air traffic. Photo by Brandon Wilson, Alaska Volcano Observatory.

U.S. Natural Gas Consumption Reaches a Daily Record High in December 2022
Energy Information Administration

On December 23, 2022, estimated total consumption of natural gas in the U.S. Lower 48 states reached a daily record high of 141.0 billion cubic feet, exceeding the previous daily record high of 137.4 Bcf set on January 1, 2018. Total consumption includes natural gas consumed in the residential, commercial, industrial, and power generation sectors. Below-normal temperatures in mid- to late-December increased demand for residential and commercial heating, as well as for electric power generation, and contributed to a steep weather-related decline in natural gas production. Graph by the Energy Information Administration.