McAfee SECURE sites help keep you safe from identity theft, credit card fraud, spyware, spam, viruses and online scams

Home » Minerals » Barite

Barite


The nonmetallic mineral with an incredible specific gravity.



What is Barite?



Barite is a mineral composed of barium sulfate (BaSO4). It receives its name from the Greek word "barys" which means "heavy." This name is in response to barite's high specific gravity of 4.5, which is exceptional for a nonmetallic mineral. The high specific gravity of barite makes it suitable for a wide range of industrial, medical and manufacturing uses. Barite also serves as the principal ore of barium.


Barite Occurrence



Barite often occurs as concretions and void-filling crystals in sediments and sedimentary rocks. It is especially common as concretions and vein fillings in limestone and dolostone. Where these carbonate rock units have been heavily weathered, large accumulations of barite are sometimes found at the soil-bedrock contact. Many of the commercial barite mines produce from these residual deposits.

Barite is also found as concretions in sand and sandstone. These concretions grow as barite crystallizes within the interstitial spaces between sand grains. Sometimes crystals of barite grow into interesting shapes within the sand. These structures are known as "barite roses" (see image at right). They can be up to several inches in length and incorporate large numbers of sand grains. Occasionally barite is so abundant in a sandstone that it serves as the "cement" for the rock.

Barite is also a common mineral in hydrothermal veins and is a gangue mineral associated with sulfide ore veins. It is found in association with ores of antimony, cobalt, copper, lead, manganese and silver. In a few locations barite is deposited as a sinter at hot springs.


Physical Properties of Barite



Barite is generally easy to identify. It is one of just a few nonmetallic minerals with a specific gravity of four or higher. Combine that with its low Mohs hardness (2.5 to 3.5) and its three directions of right angle cleavage, and the mineral can usually be reliably identified with just three observations.

Physical Properties of Barite

Chemical Classification sulfate
Color colorless, white, light blue, light yellow, light red, light green
Streak white
Luster vitreous to pearly
Diaphaneity transparent to translucent
Cleavage very good, basal, prismatic
Mohs Hardness 2.5 to 3.5
Specific Gravity 4.5
Diagnostic Properties high specific gravity, three cleavage directions at right angles
Chemical Composition barium sulfate , BaSO4
Crystal System orthorhombic
Uses drilling mud; high density filler for paper, rubber, plastics

In the classroom, students often have difficulty identifying specimens of massive barite with fine-grained crystals. They look at the specimen, see the sugary appearance, correctly attribute it to cleavage and apply a drop of dilute hydrochloric acid. The mineral effervesces and they think that they have calcite or a piece of marble. The problem is that the effervescence is caused by contamination. The students tested the hardness of the barite with a piece of calcite from their hardness kit. Or the specimen of barite can naturally contain calcite. However, any student who tests the specific gravity will discover that calcite or marble are incorrect identifications.

Barite is also a good mineral to use when teaching about specific gravity. Give students several white mineral specimens that are about the same size (we suggest calcite, quartz, barite, talc, gypsum). Students should be able to easily identify barite using the "heft test" (placing Specimen "A" in their right hand and Specimen "B" in their left hand and "hefting" the specimens to determine which one is heaviest). Students in third or fourth grade are capable of using the heft test to identify barite.


Uses of Barite



Most barite produced is used as a weighting agent in drilling muds. These high-density muds are pumped down the drill stem, exit through the cutting bit and return to the surface between the drill stem and the wall of the well. This flow of fluid does two things: 1) it cools the drill bit; and, 2) the high-density barite mud suspends the rock cuttings produced by the drill and carries them up to the surface.

Barite is also used as a pigment in paints and as a weighted filler for paper, cloth and rubber. The paper used to make some playing cards has barite packed between the paper fibers. This gives the paper a very high density that allows the cards to be "dealt" easily to players around a card table. Barite is used as a weighting filler in rubber to make "anti-sail" mudflaps for trucks.

Barite is the primary ore of barium, which is used to make a wide variety of barium compounds. Some of these are used for x-ray shielding. Barite has the ability to block x-ray and gamma-ray emissions. Barite is used to make high-density concrete to block x-ray emissions in hospitals, power plants, and laboratories.

Barite compounds are also used in diagnostic medical tests. If a patient drinks a small cup of liquid that contains a barium powder in a milkshake consistency, the liquid will coat the patient's esophagus. An x-ray of the throat taken immediately after the "barium swallow" will image the soft tissue of the esophagus (which is usually transparent to x-rays) because the barium is opaque to x-rays and blocks their passage. A "barium enema" can be used in a similar way to image the shape of the colon.


Barite Production



2011 Barite Production
Country
Thousand Metric Tons
Algeria 40
China 4,100
Germany 70
India 1,350
Iran 350
Kazakhstan 200
Mexico 157
Morocco 600
Pakistan 58
Peru 87
Russia 62
Turkey 230
United Kingdom 50
Vietnam 85
United States 710
Other Countries 220
The values above are 2011 metric tons of barite production from USGS Mineral Commodity Summary, January 2013.

The oil and gas industry is the primary user of barite worldwide. There it is used as a weighting agent in drilling mud. This is a growth industry, as global demand for oil and natural gas has been on a long-term increase. In addition, the long-term drilling trend is more feet of drilling per barrel of oil produced.

This has caused the price of barite to increase. Price levels during 2012 were between 10% and 20% higher than 2011 in many important markets. The typical price of drilling mud barite is about $150 per metric ton at the mine.

Substitutes for barite in drilling mud include: celestite, ilmenite, iron ore and synthetic hematite. None of these substitutes have been effective at displacing barite in any major market area. They are too expensive or do not perform competitively.

China and India are the leading producers of barite and they also have the largest reserves. The United States does not produce enough barite to supply its domestic needs. In 2011 the United States produced about 700,000 metric tons of barite and imported about 2,300,000 metric tons.



Find it on Geology.com




More from Geology.com


Dallol Volcano
Strange Volcanic Landscape! Photos of Dallol Volcano - an explosion crater in Ethiopia.
gem photos
100+ Gems - Photos of over 100 beautiful gems ranging from the popular to the obscure.
Geologic Hazards
Geologic Hazards include dangers like floods, earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides and more.
Find Minerals & Gems: Dozens of sites where you can dig and keep what you find.
Gemstones
Gemstones: Fantastic images and articles about colored stones and diamonds.
Hydraulic Fracturing
Hydraulic Fracturing: Increases well yield by fracturing the reservoir rock with fluid injection.
Eagle Ford Shale
Eagle Ford Shale: One of the most prolific producers of oil and gas in the United States.
Mount Etna
Mount Etna: The most active volcano in Europe, continues an eruption that started in 2001.


Barite
Barite from Kings Creek, South Carolina. Specimen is approximately 4 inches (10 centimeters) across.




More Minerals
  Minerals
  Mineral Identification Chart
  Fluorescent Minerals
  Quartz
  United States Gemstones
  Mohs Hardness Scale
  Diamond
  Find Minerals and Gems


barite rose photograph by Rob Lavinsky
This "barite rose" is a cluster of bladed barite crystals that have grown in sand, incorporating many of the sand grains within each crystal. Specimen and photo by Arkenstone / www.iRocks.com.


Barite from Canada
Barite from Madoc, Ontario, Canada. Specimen is approximately 4 inches (10 centimeters) across.


Barite from Australia
Barite from Edith River, Northern Territory, Australia. Specimen is approximately 2 inches (5 centimeters) across.


Barite from Utah
Barite from Mercur, Utah. Specimen is approximately 4 inches (10 centimeters) across.




© 2005-2014 Geology.com. All Rights Reserved.
Images, code and content of this website are property of Geology.com. Use without permission is prohibited. Pages on this site are protected by Copyscape.