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Global Sea Level Rise Map



Use the window in the top left of the map frame to change the amount of sea level rise.





The map above can be used to show which areas would be under water if sea level rises a specific amount. You can select a value of sea level rise using the drop down box in the upper left corner of the map.

This map is not a carefully surveyed and extremely accurate presentation. It is intended to provide a visual impression of which geographic areas might be flooded if global warming and climate change continue unabated.

Elevations in urban areas shown on the map may be higher than actual values due to radar reflections from the tops of buildings and other structures. This would result in flooding being more severe than shown on this map. For an interesting presentation of how sea level rise might impact important cities, see U.S. Cities We Could Lose to the Sea at Climate Central.org.

Some inland depressions, such as the Caspian Sea, show inundation on the map but would not be flooded. This is because the mapping algorithm is based upon elevation and can not distinguish areas that are separated from the oceans by a ridge or other high area. Be sure that you trace a connection with the ocean before assuming the area would be flooded.

This sea level rise map was created by Alex Tingle of firetree.net using the Google Maps API, NASA data and lots of programming savvy. He explains how the map was created, the sea level data and issues about map accuracy here. He also provides an impressive, full-monitor, global sea-level rise map on his website. We thank Alex for allowing us to share this map on Geology.com. Also thanks to Google and NASA for providing the resources needed to make this map.



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