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Quartz


A ubiquitous mineral with an enormous number of uses


What is Quartz?



Quartz is a chemical compound consisting of one part silicon and two parts oxygen. It is silicon dioxide (SiO2). It is the most abundant mineral found at Earth's surface and its unique properties make it one of the most useful natural substances.


Where is Quartz Found?



Quartz is the most abundant and widely distributed mineral found at Earth's surface. It is present and plentiful in all parts of the world. It forms at all temperatures. It is abundant in igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks. It is highly resistant to both mechanical and chemical weathering. This durability makes it the dominant mineral of mountaintops and the primary constituent of beach, river and desert sand. Quartz is ubiquitous, plentiful and durable. Minable deposits are found throughout the world.


Physical Properties of Quartz

Chemical Classification silicate
Color Quartz occurs in virtually every color. Common colors are clear, white, gray, purple, yellow, brown, black, pink, green, red.
Streak colorless (harder than the streak plate)
Luster vitreous
Diaphaneity transparent to translucent
Cleavage none - typically breaks with a conchoidal fracture
Mohs Hardness 7
Specific Gravity 2.6 to 2.7
Diagnostic Properties conchoidal fracture, glassy luster, hardness
Chemical Composition SiO2
Crystal System hexagonal
Uses


What are the Uses for Quartz?



Quartz is one of the most useful natural materials. Its usefulness can be linked to its physical and chemical properties. It has a hardness of seven on the Mohs Scale which makes it very durable. It is chemically inert in contact with most substances. It has electrical properties and heat resistance that make it valuable in electronic products. Its luster, color and diaphaneity make it useful as a gemstone and also in the making of glass.


Uses of Quartz in Glass Making



Geological processes have occasionally deposited sands that are composed of almost 100% quartz grains. These deposits have been identified and produced as sources of high purity silica sand. These sands are used in the glassmaking industry. Quartz sand is used in the production of container glass, flat plate glass, specialty glass and fiberglass.


Uses of Quartz as an Abrasive



The high hardness of quartz, seven on the Mohs Scale, makes it harder than most other natural substances. As such it is an excellent abrasive material. Quartz sands and finely ground silica sand are used for sand blasting, scouring cleansers, grinding media, and grit for sanding and sawing.


Uses of Quartz as a Foundry Sand



Quartz is very resistant to both chemicals and heat. It is therefore often used as a foundry sand. With a melting temperature higher than most metals it can be used for the molds and cores of common foundry work. Refractory brick are often made of quartz sand because of its high heat resistance. Quartz sand is also used as a flux in the smelting of metals.


Uses in the Petroleum Industry



Quartz sand has a high resistance to being crushed. In the petroleum industry sand slurries are forced down oil and gas wells under very high pressures in a process known as hydraulic fracturing. This high pressure fractures the reservoir rocks and the sandy slurry injects into the fractures. The durable sand grains hold the fractures open after the pressure is released. These open fractures facilitate the flow of natural gas into the well bore.


Many Other Quartz Sand Uses



Quartz sand is used as a filler in the manufacture of rubber, paint and putty. Screened and washed, carefully sized quartz grains are used as filter media and roofing granules. Quartz sands are used for traction in the railroad and mining industries. These sands are also used in recreation on golf courses, volleyball courts, baseball fields, children's sand boxes and beaches.


Uses of Quartz Crystals



High quality quartz crystals are single-crystal silica with optical or electronic properties that make them useful for specialty purposes. USGS estimates that about ten billion quartz crystals are used every year.

Electronics grade crystals can be used in filters, frequency controls, timers, electronic circuits that become important components in cell phones, watches, clocks, games, television receivers, computers, navigational instruments and other products. Optical-grade crystals can be used as lenses and windows in lasers and other specialized devices. Although some natural quartz crystals are used in these applications, most of these special crystals are now manufactured.


Quartz as a Gemstone



Quartz makes an excellent gemstone. It is hard, durable and usually accepts a brilliant polish. Popular varieties of quartz that are widely used as gems include: amethyst, citrine, rose quartz, and aventurine. Agate and jasper are also varieties of quartz with a microcrystalline structure.


Special Silica Stone Uses



"Silica stone" is an industrial term for materials such as quartzite, novaculite and other microcrystalline quartz rocks. These are used to produce abrasive tools, deburring media, grinding stones, hones, oilstones, stone files, tube-mill liners and whetstones.


Tripoli



Tripoli is crystalline silica of an extremely fine grain size (less than ten micrometers). Commercial tripoli is a nearly pure silica material that is used for a variety of mild abrasive purposes which include: soaps, toothpastes, metal polishing compounds, jewelry polishing compounds and buffing compounds. Tripoli is also used in brake friction products, fillers in enamel, caulking compounds, plastic, paint, rubber and refractories.


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Novaculite
"Novaculite" is a dense, cryptocrystalline variety of quartz with a fine-grained and very uniform texture. As quartz, it has a hardness of 7 (harder than steel) and is used as a "whetstone" for sharpening knives.

Blue aventurine quartz
Aventurine is colorful variety of quartz that contains abundant shiny inclusions of minerals such as mica or hematite. It is often cut and polished for use as an ornamental stone. Common colors for aventurine are green, orange and blue. This specimen is about four inches (ten centimeters) across and is from India.

Amethyst quartz
Purple crystalline quartz is known as "amethyst". When transparent and of high quality it is often cut as a gemstone. This specimen is about four inches (ten centimeters) across and is from Guanajuato, Mexico.

quartz - flint
Flint is a variety of microcrystalline or cryptocrystalline quartz. It occurs as nodules and concretionary masses and less frequently as a layered deposit. It breaks consistently with a conchoidal fracture and was one of the first materials used to make tools by early people. They used it to make cutting tools. After thousands of years, people continue to use it. It is presently used as the cutting edge in some of the finest surgical tools. This specimen is about four inches (ten centimeters) across and is from Dover Cliffs, England.
herkimer quartz crystals
Herkimer "Diamond" quartz crystals. A clear, "rock crystal" variety of quartz.


quartz glass windows
Glassmaking is one of the primary uses of quartz. © iStockphoto / Chinaface.

quartz flint arrowheads
One of the first uses of quartz, in the form of flint, was the production of sharp objects such as knife blades, scrapers and projectile points such as the arrowheads shown above. © iStockphoto / Leslie Banks

quartz beads jasper
Quartz is often used in jewelry or as a gemstone. These jasper beads are an example of quartz used as a gemstone.

quartz glass sand
High purity quartz sandstone suitable for the manufacture of high quality glass. "Glass sand" is a sandstone that is composed almost entirely of quartz grains. Pictured here is a specimen of the Oriskany Sandstone from Hancock, West Virginia. In a few locations the Oriskany is over 99% pure quartz. Much of it has been used for container glass but some of it has been selected for use in making lenses for the largest telescopes. Specimen is about four inches (ten centimeters across).

rose quartz
Translucent rose quartz in the rough.

ametrine
Ametrine: a bicolor stone combining golden citrine and purple amethyst - 8x10 mm

Rose quartz beads
Translucent rose quartz - cut and polished beads. Each bead is about ten millimeters in diameter.

rock crystal quartz
Transparent "rock crystal" quartz. This specimen shows the conchoidal fracture (fracture that produces curved surfaces) that is characteristic of the mineral. Specimen is about four inches (ten centimeters) across and is from Minas Gerais, Brazil.

Chert
Chert is a microcrystaline or cryptocrystalline quartz. It occurs as nodules and concretionary masses and less frequently as a layered deposit. This specimen is about four inches (ten centimeters) across and is from Joplin, Missouri.

Silicified wood
Silicified "petrified" wood is formed when buried plant debris is infiltrated with mineral-bearing waters which precipitate quartz. This quartz infills the cavities within the wood and often replaces the woody tissues. This specimen is about four inches (ten centimeters) across and is from Yuma County, Arizona.

Herkimer diamond in source rock
A Herkimer "Diamond" quartz crystal in dolostone. This specimen is about six inches (fifteen centimeters) across and is from Middleville, New York.


Mineral Information
 Andalusite
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 Nepheline
 Nephrite

 Olivine
 Orthoclase

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 Quartz

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 Talc
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 Turquoise

 Uraninite

 Witherite
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 Zircon
 Zoisite


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