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Home » Minerals » Chalcopyrite

Chalcopyrite


Mineral Properties and Uses



What is Chalcopyrite?



Chalcopyrite is a copper iron sulfide. It is the most commonly encountered copper mineral and is the most important ore of copper. Chalcopyrite deposits are found in hydrothermal veins, void fillings and replacements in limestones, contact metamorphic deposits and magmatic separations. Minor amounts are found throughout many igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks.


Physical Properties of Chalcopyrite

Chemical Classification sulfide
Color brass yellow
Streak greenish black
Luster metallic
Diaphaneity opaque
Cleavage poor
Mohs Hardness 3.5 to 4
Specific Gravity 4.1 to 4.3
Diagnostic Properties color, streak, softer than pyrite
Chemical Composition copper iron sulfide, CuFeS2
Crystal System tetragonal
Uses An important ore of copper.


Chalcopyrite from Arizona
Chalcopyrite from Ajo, Arizona. Specimen is approximately 4 inches (10 centimeters) across.


Chalcopyrite from Utah
Chalcopyrite from Park City, Utah. This specimen is approximately 5.5 inches (14 centimeters) across.


Crystallized Chalcopyrite
A close-up of the crystallized chalcopyrite on dolomite from Baxter Springs, Kansas. Actual specimen is approximately 4 inches (10 centimeters) across.



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Chalcopyrite
Chalcopyrite, auriferous with pyrrhotite from Rouyn District, Quebec, Canada. This specimen is approximately 4 inches (10 centimeters) across.




Chalcopyrite in dolomite
Crystallized chalcopyrite on dolomite from Baxter Springs, Kansas. Specimen is approximately 4 inches (10 centimeters) across.


Chalcopyrite from Canada
Chalcopyrite from Rouyn District, Quebec, Canada. This specimen is approximately 4 inches (10 centimeters) across.


Mineral Information
 Andalusite
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