McAfee SECURE sites help keep you safe from identity theft, credit card fraud, spyware, spam, viruses and online scams

Home » Minerals » Arsenopyrite

Arsenopyrite


Mineral Properties and Uses



What is Arsenopyrite?



Arsenopyrite is an iron arsenic sulfide. It is the most common arsenic mineral and the primary ore of arsenic metal. Arsenopyrite is most often found as a hydrothermal vein mineral and sometimes as a mineral of contact metamorphism. It is sometimes referred to in old texts as "mispickel".


Physical Properties of Arsenopyrite

Chemical Classification sulfide
Color silver white to steel gray
Streak dark grayish black
Luster metallic
Diaphaneity opaque
Cleavage poor
Mohs Hardness 5.5 to 6
Specific Gravity 5.9 to 6.2
Diagnostic Properties smells like garlic when crushed, crystal form
Chemical Composition iron arsenic sulfide, FeAsS
Crystal System monoclinic
Uses poison, preservative, pigment



Find it on Geology.com




More from Geology.com


The Acid Test
The Acid Test: Geologists use dilute hydrochloric acid to identify carbonate minerals.
oil and gas rights
Oil and Gas Rights: Who owns the minerals under your land? Who wants to buy them?
Land Below Sea Level
Land Below Sea Level: Did you know that dozens of land locations are below sea level?
Facts About Copper
Facts About Copper: Information about copper uses, production, resources and more.
caldera
Calderas are enormous volcanic craters formed by some of Earth\'s largest eruptions.
Astronomy
Astronomy: Fantastic images and articles about solar system and deep-space astronomy.
Mohs Hardness Test
Mohs Hardness Scale is a set of reference minerals used for classroom hardness testing.
Geologic Hazards
Geologic Hazards include dangers like floods, earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides and more.


Arsenopyrite
Arsenopyrite from Gold Hill, Utah. Specimen is approximately 4 inches (10 centimeters) across.




More Minerals
  Minerals
  Mohs Hardness Scale
  Fluorescent Minerals
  Diamonds Do Not Form From Coal
  Mineral Identification Chart
  Quartz
  Minerals in Colored Glass
  The Acid Test




© 2005-2014 Geology.com. All Rights Reserved.
Images, code and content of this website are property of Geology.com. Use without permission is prohibited. Pages on this site are protected by Copyscape.